Heart-Healthy Minestrone Soup

Heart-Healthy Minestrone Soup

I’ve been on a big soup kick lately. And on a relaxing Sunday afternoon (especially during another Michigan winter), there’s something especially comforting about making a fresh batch of homemade soup. I’ve made a variety of soups already, but today I tackled a heart-healthy homemade Minestrone for the first time, and boy was it delicious. It proved to be a perfect addition to a side salad for the first course of our dinner of Lasagna Rolls. And since it was my first time making Minestrone, I am also able to check off another recipe for my 50 in 15 Challenge.

Ingredients

  • 2-3 tbsp. Olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 c. celery, diced
  • 1 c. carrots, diced
  • 1 c. green beans (cut to 1/2″ pieces)
  • 1/2 c. zucchini, diced
  • 1/2 c. yellow squash, diced
  • 1 tsp. oregano
  • 1 tsp. basil
  • Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper
  • 28 oz. can low-sodium (or no-salt-added) diced tomatoes
  • 14 oz. can crushed tomatoes
  • 15 oz. can low-sodium kidney beans (drained and rinsed)
  • 6 c. low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 c. elbow pasta (or other type of pasta, if desired)

Directions

  1. Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Cook the onion and garlic until the onion softens and becomes translucent, about 4 minutes.
  2. Add celery, carrots, zucchini, and squash, cooking until they start to soften, about 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in green beans, herbs, salt, and pepper to taste, and cook an additional 3-5 minutes.
  4. Add diced and crushed tomatoes and the broth, bringing to a boil.
  5. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 10-12 minutes.
  6. Stir in the beans and pasta, cooking an additional 10 minutes (or until the pasta is tender).
  7. Optional: Top each serving with freshly-grated Parmesan cheese and freshly chopped basil.

Notes

One of the things I love about soup recipes is that they’re very flexible. You can leave out, add in, swap, and/or adjust the quantity of many of the ingredients as desired. For instance, I wanted to have zucchini and squash in the soup, but realized once I started prepping everything that I didn’t have them on hand. So I simply left them out, added in some more celery and carrots, and the end result didn’t suffer. Or, if you’re not concerned about the soup being vegetarian, you can use chicken broth in place of the vegetable broth (which I did for this round of soup). Soup is very flexible like that, and this recipe follows suit.

Overall, I was very happy with the result of my Minestrone. It was simple and quick to prepare, and was very healthy and tasty — just the way it should be. This is definitely a recipe I’ll be making again!

Bon Appétit!

 

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